Torso

 Abbie Sherwood

The prosthetic for this work is initially constructed from flying body parts assembled on the body of the live dancer. The background is a pastiche of visceral corporeal parts that explode in semi-liquid psychedelic fashion. This is a multiple layering of physicality, creating a three-fold effect: a body, on a body, in a body. The animated body replaces itself in various ways. Initially duplicating from single to multiple forms, as the work progresses the replication increases. At one point the body seems reminiscent of cells splitting and reforming, a alluding to gene manipulation and invitro fertilisation. Eventually, the animation implodes disappearing, leaving only the real dancer’s form.

Choreographed and Animated by Megan Beckwith

Performed by Abbie Sherwood

Sound by Jacques Soddell

Bug (AKA Insect)

 Megan Beckwith

Organ transplants are one of the great medical and technical achievements. It is this success has led to an ever-increasing number of patients and crises in organ supply. Current research into “Xenotransplantion” examines how animal tissue could replace human body parts, such as baboon cells for the treatment of AIDS or pig livers to replace a human one or cow cells for acute pain. What may happen in the future? If insects could be used as donors what may happen physically or psychologically to the human host?

Animated, Choreographed and Performed by Megan Beckwith

Sound by Jacques Soddell

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Arm

 Ellen David

An animated prosthetic limb acquires massive form. It out-sizes the dancer’s original body part making the performer appear vulnerable in comparison. The limb also morphs into dangerous representations. It morphs and twists out of control only to reform in treacherous shapes such as a claw, snake and robotic attachment. Although humorous, the dancer is unable to stop the relentlessness of the arm and can only be dominated by the prosthetic. The balance of power between the dancer and the prosthetic is a constant battle.

Choreographed and Animated by Megan Beckwith

Performed by Ellen David

Sound by Jacques Soddell

Boneidol

 Megan Beckwith

Our bodies are changing. Increasingly we modify what we can – eye laser surgery, hip reconstructions, pacemakers, breast enhancements, botox and sun screen. These types of modifications are a result of the advances in technology. We are cyborgs humans with technological modifications that defy age and mortality. One day we will live indefinitely.

Animated, Choreographed and Performed by Megan Beckwith

Sound by Jacques Soddell

Feet

 Martina Fellows

The application of technology has allowed the body to negotiate time, space and movement in new ways. The body becomes ambiguous and questionable as physicality morphs into different shapes, raising question of what constitutes the real body? This vision explore both utopic and dystopic themes within the cyborg tradition. The dancer is freed from her physical body but also constrained by it; her feet in one moment are metallic wings one moment and another twisting talons. She exists in a magical technological world, one that illuminates her body transforming her to an ethereal being free from gravities rules. However, she is also trapped in an unrelenting environment with a prosthesis that appears to torture and inflict serious harm.

Choreographed and Animated by Megan Beckwith

Performed by Martina Fellows

Sound by Jacques Soddell